British Values in History

We feel that the History curriculum teaches many of the core British values. Most are covered in each Key Stage and all are covered within the three Key Stages.

KS3

  • Pupils study the development of law and order (from the first trial by ordeal through to the rule of law and the police force)
  • Pupils study the development of parliamentary systems from the Magna Carta through to the extension of the franchise (Chartists and Suffragettes)
  • Pupils study the challenges of extremism, prejudice and discrimination through topics such as Atlantic slavery, Soviet communism and the Holocaust
  • Pupils study the importance of religion and religious freedom through the Reformation and the English Civil War
  • Pupils study the role of the citizen through topics like the US Civil Rights Movement

KS4

  • Pupils study the importance of law and order through topics like 1960s Britain (e.g. the Race Relations Acts)
  • Pupils study the importance of parliamentary systems by looking at different ideologies; through the study of 20th century Germany and the Cold War
  • Pupils study the impact of religion and religious freedom by looking at how the treatment and prevention of medicine has changed over time
  • Pupils study how citizens can contribute positively to Modern Britain by looking at how the roles of different groups in society have changed in the post-war period, e.g. women and Afro-Caribbean people

KS5

  • Students study the development of law and order by looking at how the process of law-making has changed in 20th century Britain as well as Tudor England
  • Students study parliamentary systems in Tudor England and Modern Britainas well as the move from autocracy to communist dictatorship in Russia
  • Students study the impact of religion and religious freedom by looking at the Tudor Reformation, the decline in Christianity and the move to a multi-faith society in Modern Britain
  • Students study how citizens can contribute positively to society by comparing the role and treatment of citizens in Tudor England, Tsarist and Soviet Russia and Modern Britain.

Respecting civil and criminal law

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The establishment of law and order in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The use of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The abuse of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Crime and punishment in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The role of people and protest as a vehicle for change
  • Pupils and students are challenged to understand the reasoning behind laws and how legislation can differ between countries and hwo this may impact upon Britain itself

Appreciate the viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The causes and consequences of conflict in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Interpretations of historical events, people and periods
  • Causes for the development of divergent interpretations. Pupils are expected to weigh up both sides of any argument and provide a reasoned response that underpins their own stance to these issues
  • Moral values in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Ethical actions in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries

Acceptance and engagement with the fundamental British values of democracy

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The establishment of law and order in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The use of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The abuse of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The role of people and protest as a vehicle for change
  • The development of individual opinions

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • Citizenship – what it means to be a citizen of Great Britain and the importance of exercising our civil rights
  • The integral importance of utilising the right to vote
  • The ability to appreciate divergent nations, events, people and beliefs
  • The ability to think critically, engage in discussions and question events and beliefs
  • Home and global events – their causes and effects

Actively fighting extremism and radicalisation

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • Human rights and responsibilities
  • Civil rights and responsibilities
  • Conflict and its impact on people and places
  • An interlinked and global community
  • The ability to think critically, engage in discussions and question events and beliefs. Pupils are expected to weigh up both sides of any argument and provide a reasoned response that underpins their own stance to these issues