British Values in Economics, Law, Psychology and Sociology

Through the study of A Levels in Economics, Law, Psychology and Sociology students develop:

An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process

  • how law is made
  • how Parliament works
  • the nature of Parliamentary Sovereignty
  • Judicial law making and democracy
  • the nature of and justification for judicial creativity in the making of law
  • understanding the importance of key economic decisions
  • understanding the role of government in economic policy
  • discussions of political policies and the issues of government failure

An appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their wellbeing and safety;

  • The nature of law and the rule of law:
  • individual obligations and rights
  • basic ideas about law and justice
  • individual responsibilities under criminal law and the law of tort
  • detailed analysis of an individual’s rights and responsibilities in criminal law
  • sociological understanding of the nature of law
  • the role of the education system and national and local responsibilities regarding the education and well- being of young people. An understanding of legislation which aims to protect young people in the family and the education system.
  • the role of the education system and national and local responsibilities regarding the education and well- being of young people. An understanding of legislation which aims to protect young people in the family and the education system.
  • the role of the police and the criminal justice system.

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary, and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence:

  • nature of the Parliamentary Law Making process
  • independence of the judiciary
  • relationship between Parliament Government and Judiciary in the making and administration of law

An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law:

  • freedom of expression and other fundamental man rights as protected by the Human Rights Act
  • the relationship between law and morality
  • the rights of a society as opposed to individual right
  • issues that arise due to religious beliefs within the family as well as within the education system.
  • legislation which surrounds faith schools
  • issues that arise as a consequence of holding particular religious beliefs and the possibility of conflicts which arise as a result

An acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour:

  • basic ideas about anti-discrimination and equality law
  • the issues that arise when law and individual morality are in conflict.
  • analysis of the philosophical and legal issues
  • different views on a range of issues including divorce and homosexuality
  • issues arising within the criminal justice system regarding gender and crime and ethnicity and crime. A review of the Stephen Lawrence case and the subsequent Macpherson report

An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination:

  • ideas of equality under the law and the protection of fundamental human rights
  • the nature of law and justice and the role of law in protecting individual rights and enforcing responsibilities
  • issues such as wage differentials and poverty
  • impact of globalisation on the developed and developing world
  • equality under the law and of the protection of human rights. Issues arising within the Family and Households Unit include the notion of ‘honour’ killings and within the Education unit differences in achievement between ethnic groups
  • equality under the law and of the protection of human rights