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British Values by Subject

Art and Design

 British Values in Art and Design

The Art & Design curriculum delivers British values through developing a fascination of learning about the world we live in, having a sense of enjoyment and participating in artistic and creative activities.

  • Art promotes tolerance in a variety of different ways. For example: exploring ideas, creative responses, analysing different cultural influences, considering different styles and religious iconography within art and design.
  • Pupils and students work with mutual respect for each other. They explore controversial issues but always maintain tolerance for the beliefs and opinions of others.
  • Art lessons allow pupils and students to discuss a wide variety of artists, designers and makers including key British art movements.
  • The Art Department encourages pupils and students to visit a range of galleries, exhibitions and museums.
  • Independent work is expected. Peer, self and teacher assessment supports and builds self-esteem through tasks, sharing ideas and resources, peer-assessment and encouraging students to support each other.

Examples of topics that promote British Values in Art

Year 7.  Pop Art, incorporating cultural and societal changes

Year 8.  1950s British Art at The Festival of Britain

KS4 GCSE: We promote individual liberty as we encourage pupils to be independent.

We look at a broad range of artists/designers and makers from a range of cultural backgrounds and experiences.

A level Art.  Essay topics that include: tolerance of different opinions, creative responses, controversial issues.

Business & Computing

British Values in Business

Respect civil and criminal law

Students learn about a range of laws and legislation relating to business:

  • The impact of government and the EU on business
  • The Consumer Rights Act (covering goods, digitalcontent and services)
  • Health & Safety Regulations
  • Data Protection Act
  • Consumer Credit Act
  • Distance selling regulations
  • Voluntary codes of advertising practice (ASA)

Appreciate viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Students are taught about:

  • Ethics in business and ethical trading
  • The impacts of business activity on the environment

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British Values of democracy

Democratic acceptance and engagement is embedded in our teaching. For example:

  • Students are encouraged to engage in current affairs and watch news from various media sources
  • The election process and different party manifesto pledges form the basis of class discussions in relation to their impact on businesses
  • How to select information from valid online sources that reflect different viewpoints and the disadvantages of relying on Wikipedia
  • How awareness of cultural differences is vital for true globalisation of businesses

British Values in Computing

Respect civil and criminal law

Students learn about a range of laws and legislation relating to the use of computers:

  • Copyright, Designs and Patents Act
  • Health & Safety Regulations
  • Data Protection Act
  • Computer Misuse Act
  • Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act
  • Communications Act

Appreciate viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Students are taught about the moral and ethical implications of technology including

  • Increasing use of CCTV for security and its potential invasion of privacy implications
  • How technology has changed society socially and in the workplace
  • How artificial intelligence and robotics are impacting on people’s everyday lives
  • Censorship of the internet
  • eSafety, cyberbullying and child protection
  • The environmental effects of computer technology

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British Values of democracy

Democratic acceptance and engagement is embedded in our teaching. For example:

  • All opinions are valued in group/class discussions and all students have the opportunity to contribute
  • Students are encouraged to keep up with the latest technology news and to balance the benefits and risks associated with using technology
  • How to select information from valid online sources that reflect different viewpoints and the disadvantages of relying on Wikipedia

Child Development

British Values in Child Development

Through the study of Child Development pupils develop:

An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process:

  • choice of feeding
  • choice of contraception

An appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their wellbeing and safety;

  • Maternity statutory services
  • Welfare services – adoption & fostering

An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law:

  • Multi-cultural faiths
  • Modern day families

An acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour:

  • Multi-cultural faiths

An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination:

  • Special children & their families

Design Technology

British Values in Design Technology

In the Technology Faculty we encourage social and moral thinking through designing and making. We consider the appropriateness of design ideas with consideration given to Social and Moral values including cultural influences.

We teach sustainability to all pupils so they are aware of material choices and the processes the materials have gone through in order to become available to us.

We celebrate successes and reward positive behaviour through Newman Points and postcards home. We acknowledge good work by sharing successes via the school website, newsletter and school chronicle.

We often consider designs and the effect these have on other people, not just focused on the intended user.

We discuss material choice and manufacture, sustainability and deforestation, along with the ethical issues associated with food choice through all key stages. We also refer to the impact that advancing technology has on the environment for example mining of minerals needed for mobile phones.

English

British Values in English

Respect civil and criminal law

Through the study of English students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

The consequences of following the law or not (KS4 - Of Mice and Men, An Inspector Calls, A View from the Bridge, The Crucible KS3 - Private Peaceful, Bog Child, Holes, Stone Cold)

The abuse of power (KS4 - Lord of the Flies, The Crucible/Great Expectations KS3 - The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, Holes, Matilda, Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird)

Appreciate viewpoints of others

Through the study of English students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

Critical approaches to texts; seeing alternative viewpoints and interpretations

Constructing arguments on: racism, sexism, homelessness, identity, homophobia, conflict and war and moral dilemmas (KS4 Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird, Poetry from other cultures KS3 Bog Child, Private Peaceful, War Horse, Skellig, Refugee Boy, Stone Cold).

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British values of democracy

Through the study of English students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

The importance of taking an active part in debates, appreciating other people's views in debates/responding to current issues and controversial topics through speaking and listening topic.

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Through the study of English students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

The ability to think critically, engage in classroom discussions and listen to alternative viewpoints on issues arising from texts;

Home and global events and how they are represented in the media, including fiction and non-fiction (KS4 War poetry, An Inspector Calls KS3 - persuasive language in political speeches and advertising);

How charity campaigns convince their target audiences.

Actively fighting extremism and radicalisation

Through the study of English students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

Discussing human rights and responsibilities, being critical and evaluative in dealing with the issues raised in texts they read;

Discussion arising from (KS4 Lord of the Flies, Cultural poetry, An Inspector Calls KS3 Private Peaceful, Stone Cold, Refugee Boy)

Geography

British Values in Geography

British Values are integral to the teaching of Geography at the John Henry Newman School.  We aim to help our students develop their awareness of the physical and human world and in doing so to enable them to appreciate their position in a global context.  Within this we focus many aspects of teaching on the UK and allow pupils and students the opportunity to explore what it means to hold British Values.

Examples of topics that promote British Values in Geography (covered in differing levels of depth and detail across Key Stage 3, 4 and 5).

Respect civil and criminal law

The EU and the role it plays in the UK.  For example: influencing industrial location, urban regeneration, trade tariffs, regulation and legislation.

Appreciate viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Development.  For example, exploring why some countries are more developed than others including historical factors such as colonialisation.

Trade.  For example: the influence of core and periphery countries in understanding the balance of power in global trade, should we work to make trade fairer?

Climate change.  For example: understanding the impact that High Income Countries like the UK have on the environment, the impact of different approaches to energy and transport.

Acceptance and engagement with British Values of democracy

The role of democracy.  For example: how the UK is shaping policies relating to migration and border controls, the position of the UK in the EU.

Contrasting different political systems with the UK.  For example: population policies in China, development strategies in Dubai, energy and geopolitics in the EU, Russia and the former USSR.

History

British Values in History

We feel that the History curriculum teaches many of the core British values. Most are covered in each Key Stage and all are covered within the three Key Stages.

KS3

 

  • Pupils study the development of law and order (from the first trial by ordeal through to the rule of law and the police force)
  • Pupils study the development of parliamentary systems from the Magna Carta through to the extension of the franchise (Chartists and Suffragettes)
  • Pupils study the challenges of extremism, prejudice and discrimination through topics such as Atlantic slavery, Soviet communism and the Holocaust
  • Pupils study the importance of religion and religious freedom through the Reformation and the English Civil War
  • Pupils study the role of the citizen through topics like the US Civil Rights Movement

KS4

  • Pupils study the importance of law and order through topics like 1960s Britain (e.g. the Race Relations Acts)
  • Pupils study the importance of parliamentary systems by looking at different ideologies; through the study of 20th century Germany and the Cold War
  • Pupils study the impact of religion and religious freedom by looking at how the treatment and prevention of medicine has changed over time
  • Pupils study how citizens can contribute positively to Modern Britain by looking at how the roles of different groups in society have changed in the post-war period, e.g. women and Afro-Caribbean people

 

KS5

  • Students study the development of law and order by looking at how the process of law-making has changed in 20th century Britain as well as Tudor England
  • Students study parliamentary systems in Tudor England and Modern Britainas well as the move from autocracy to communist dictatorship in Russia
  • Students study the impact of religion and religious freedom by looking at the Tudor Reformation, the decline in Christianity and the move to a multi-faith society in Modern Britain
  • Students study how citizens can contribute positively to society by comparing the role and treatment of citizens in Tudor England, Tsarist and Soviet Russia and Modern Britain.

Respecting civil and criminal law

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The establishment of law and order in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The use of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The abuse of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Crime and punishment in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The role of people and protest as a vehicle for change
  • Pupils and students are challenged to understand the reasoning behind laws and how legislation can differ between countries and hwo this may impact upon Britain itself

Appreciate the viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The causes and consequences of conflict in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Interpretations of historical events, people and periods
  • Causes for the development of divergent interpretations. Pupils are expected to weigh up both sides of any argument and provide a reasoned response that underpins their own stance to these issues
  • Moral values in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Ethical actions in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries

Acceptance and engagement with the fundamental British values of democracy

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The establishment of law and order in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The use of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The abuse of power and control in Britain, 1066-present day and in other nations, including Germany, America and Russia in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • The role of people and protest as a vehicle for change
  • The development of individual opinions

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • Citizenship – what it means to be a citizen of Great Britain and the importance of exercising our civil rights
  • The integral importance of utilising the right to vote
  • The ability to appreciate divergent nations, events, people and beliefs
  • The ability to think critically, engage in discussions and question events and beliefs
  • Home and global events – their causes and effects

Actively fighting extremism and radicalisation

Through the study of History, pupils and students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • Human rights and responsibilities
  • Civil rights and responsibilities
  • Conflict and its impact on people and places
  • An interlinked and global community
  • The ability to think critically, engage in discussions and question events and beliefs. Pupils are expected to weigh up both sides of any argument and provide a reasoned response that underpins their own stance to these issues

Maths

British Values in Mathematics

Respect civil and criminal law

In mathematics lessons students are taught to think about their behaviour in the classroom and to morally distinguish between right and wrong. 

The Mathematics department follows the school behaviour policy using rewards and sanctions when appropriate. Staff give pupils and students clear reasons as to why they are being given out.

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British values of democracy

We actively promote the fundamental British values of democracy through:

  • Group presentations in Mathematics with a democratic voting system

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Students actively contribute positively through:

  • Competitions such as the UKMT group Mathematics challenge

Modern Foreign Languages

British Values in Modern Foreign Languages

People, their relationships and their interactions with others are an intrinsic part of what we teach in MFL. By its very nature, our subject enables pupils and students to become more aware of key British values and the British identity (vs the one of the Target Language country) and teachers promote these values throughout the year by modelling respect and tolerance as well as via discussing key issues / traditions and customs across the Key stages.

Mutual respect

  • Teachers model the respectful behaviour they expect from students and they are rewarded or sanctioned accordingly.

  • MFL lessons are conducted in an atmosphere of mutual respect where students listen and comment on each other’s work, highlighting successes and offering ideas on how to improve.

  • Students learn about the different traditions in the TL country such as foods, music and festivals.

  • We look at school life and how it differs from the system in the UK, looking at the pros and cons to both countries

  • Students learn about how different countries celebrate important dates such as Christmas and Easter

  • Films and music from the TL are used in lessons in all key stages and examined in more detail at KS5

  • Students have been part of discussions and interschool exchanges during which they have actively demonstrated what these mean. We aspire to promote these values and increase the students’ knowledge of the importance of mutual respect – in school, our local community, nationally and in the wider world.

  • There are units in the KS4 and KS5 curriculum that focus on the effects on marginalisation which arises when mutual respect and tolerance does not exist and our students deepen their understanding of the very serious consequences of this. At KS5 students study La Haine, a film by Matthieu Kassovitz, which encourages our students to consider what happens when the second generation immigrant population feels unjustly marginalised and neglected.

Acceptance and tolerance

  • Our KS5 curriculum enables us to discuss and compare the different views / social debates / legal positions & rules in England vs target language countries. We also encourage students to discover, discuss and debate unfamiliar lifestyles, global events, political issues, problems and changes in our KS5 curriculum.

  • As a department we are constantly striving to break down stereotypical views of different cultures and historical prejudices. This ensures that they remain open to the world around them and have a better grasp of the links and connections between countries and societies. This in turn emphasises the need for tolerance and justice, and through their studies, our students come to value the rule of law and democratic systems

  • Across the key stages we study topics relating to tolerance including the study of La Haine at A-Level. There are also units within the KS4 and KS5 curriculum that focus on celebrations and customs of other faiths in the countries where the language being taught is spoken. Across all units, students are often encouraged to develop and reflect upon their own thoughts and beliefs. Within this we create a safe space for students to share these ideas with their peers.

  • Our MFL exchanges and overseas trips have also allowed our students to witness first hand other faiths and cultures. 

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

  • The group and pair work in the classroom which is a prominent feature of our lessons, promotes close cooperation, healthy debate and respect for others’ views; all key attributes to be a confident citizen in today’s Britain.

Music

British Values in Music

Respect civil and criminal law

  • Focus on rewards to reinforce high expectations of behaviour and approach to study.
  • Students are taught how to be an appreciative and supportive audience who listen attentively whilst others perform.
  • We think about responsibilities of teenagers through the study of Rock and Roll looking at the historical and social context and why the song Rock Around The Clock was controversial in its day. - Appreciate viewpoints of others on ethical issues
  • We talk about the way women are represented in the Pop industry and consider whether all successful female artists are good role models for young women.
  • Look at injustice and deprivation in parts of the world such as India, Africa, the Caribbean and China as we study their cultures and Music.
  • Consider how the working class were treated during the Industrial revolution and the different life experiences of rich and poor people in the 19th Century and now.
  • We look at Modern art music and ask whether it is still elitist.
  • Btec students study the issues associated with copyright law.

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British values of democracy

  • At the end of each project students review their learning
  • Students work in groups and learn to cooperate, listen to other viewpoints and persuade others accepting differing points of view.
  • Students in choir and wind band are encouraged to make suggestions about repertoire.
  • Strong element of student voice in extra-curricular and enrichment programmes.
  • Student leadership of the jazz band allows the student voice to be shared

  • Older students take a leading role in the school production acting as assistant directors, stage managers, choreographers etc.

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

  • All students are encouraged to join in with extra-curricular activities.
  • Students perform at presentation evening and other school events
  • Students perform regularly at community events outside of school such as The Stevenage Festival and at our feeder primary schools
  • Students support worship through musical participation in Mass and assemblies
  • Study the music of Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth, Holst, folksongs, Benjamin Britten, Tippet, Mike Oldfield, The Beatles, Queen, Norah Jones,  David Bowie, Johnny Dankworth and Cleo Lane, Andrew Lloyd Webber

Performing Arts

British Values in Performing Arts

Through the study of Drama and Dance pupils and students develop:

An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process

  • units based on values surrounding skills needed to perform but equally skills required to work in a group & within a class & respect others – some issue based drama’s/dances are built around this.
  • Issue based Drama based around British Values

An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law

  • American Civil Rights
  • The Berlin Wall
  • Unit on Persecution

An acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour:

  • Exploration of plays from different cultures
  • Docu Drama – The Holocaust, Hillsborough Disaster etc
  • Research of influential choreographers from different cultures

An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination:

  • Unit on Persecution

Politics

British Values in Politics

We feel that the Politics KS5 curriculum teaches many of the core British values.

  • Students study the development of law and order by looking at the role of the judiciary in Britain and America
  • Students study parliamentary systems in Britain and America
  • Students study the impact of religion and religious freedom by looking at the role of the Church in British politics and the separation of religion and state in America
  • Students study how citizens can contribute positively to society through their study of political participation and pluralism in Britain and America

Respecting civil and criminal law

Through the study of Politics, students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The judiciary in Britain and America. Students learn about the structure of the court systems and the role of government in passing legislation and sentencing requirements
  • Judicial independence in Britain
  • Judicial neutrality in Britain
  • The power of judicial review in America
  • The role of the citizen in law; students learn about civil liberties and rights and responsibilities that citizens have
  • Sentencing and the penal systems in Britain and America

Appreciate the viewpoints of others on ethical issues

Through the study of Politics, students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • The Human Rights Act. Students study case studies using the HRA and debate if it is fit for purpose
  • The American Bill of Rights. Students study the development and impact of the Bill of Rights and how it impacts on modern-day America, e.g. the debate about capital punishment

Acceptance and engagement with the fundamental British values of democracy

Through the study of Politics, students develop a knowledge, appreciation and understanding of:

  • Parliamentary democracy in Britain and America
  • Local, regional and national governments in Britain
  • Local, state and federal governments in America and the challenges of federalism
  • The British and American political systems
  • Laws and why we need them

Contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Through the study of Politics, students actively contribute positively through:

  • Learning about the importance of democracy and voting
  • Teaching others in the school community about the importance of democracy and voting through PSCHE
  • Students have helped to run a Mock Election to mirror the 2015 General election
  • Students have led presentations and Q and A sessions about key political issues, e.g. the EU referendum
  • Students have participated actively in local Youth Parliamentelections and online petitions
  • Students visit the Houses of Parliament and 10 Downing Street to see British democracy in action
  • Students are encouraged to contact their local MPs
  • Many students work alongside their local MPs, or constituency parties. Some have campaigned in elections.
  • Some students have witnessed PMQs first-hand from the public balcony in the House of Commons

Actively fighting extremism and radicalisation

Through the study of Politics, students actively contribute positively through:

  • Regular discussions on extremism and radicalisation as part of our overall study of global politics
  • Study of civil liberties and rights and responsibilities
  • Discussions about key issues in Britain and America, e.g. EDL and the riots in Ferguson, Missouri

Physical Education

British Values in Physical Education

Respect civil and criminal law

In the PE department we encourage moral thinking; we make the students aware of physical, mental, social and moral choices with regards to taking part, teamwork and competition. We celebrate successes and reward positive behaviour through competitions, rewards and we also send home congratulations postcards. We celebrate success also by hosting an annual Sports Awards evening to share these personal achievements and team success.

Appreciate the viewpoints of others on ethical issues.

In PE lessons and in clubs we promote and encourage individual expression of the ethnic and cultural values of all students. We encourage and research the discussion of ethical issues through sport at GCSE & A Level in theory work.

Acceptance and engagement with fundamental British values of democracy

Students are all members of class and club teams through all key stages which encourages them to work collaboratively and fairly with each other. The picking and selecting of teams is completed in a way in which students can feel part of group to achieve. Inter form competitions and events such as sports day allows students to work in a community encouraging core British values in society.

 

Projects contribute positively to life in Modern Britain

Clubs links, extra-curricular events and sports tours all enhance the positive modern British Life and allows students to experience the life styles of others from around the world. Competition is an important part of the extra-curricular programmes at JHN following on from the Olympics and other worldwide sporting events we are always trying to promote involvement in fixtures, health and fitness and general wellbeing. These all contribute to positive life in modern Britain.

Religious Education

British Values in Religious Education

British values are predominantly evident throughout Religious Education in the context of Catholic Social Teaching, which underpins our Christian values.  The value of all pupils and staff, 'created in the image and likeness of God', underpins the way we form relationships in RE.  British values permeate the learning environment as we strive to foster values of respect, tolerance and understanding where people might be different.  Through the Christian value of forgiveness and by modelling ourselves on Christ himself, British values cannot be divorced from the love that we have for one another. In Religious Education pupils are encouraged to develop their skills of reflection and evaluation where the views of others are considered and valued.  Sources of wisdom are used to demonstrate the importance of authority and, whilst predominantly Catholic teaching is explored, the study of other world religions is compared and contrasted to enable pupils and students to engage and contribute positively and respectfully in the wider world.

Examples of how British Values are developed in Religious Education:

  • An understanding of the rule of law through the study of creation and stewardship, as well as the relationship between the Ten Commandments and the law of the land in Key Stage 3, the study of ‘Britain Today’ in Key Stage 5 Core RE and Secularisation in A Level Christianity
  • An understanding of democracy in relation to Religious Ethics at Key Stage 5 A Level
  • An understanding of mutual respect through the study of creation in Year 8, exploring this from a number of faith perspectives, opportunities for comparative religious studies throughout Years 7 and 8, and the introduction to the study of Judaism in Year 9.  In Year 11 Marriage is explored as part of the GCSE course and a variety of themes within the Core RE content foster this value of respect
  • An understanding of religious freedom and pluralism through the study of different world religions at all Key Stages, including Core RE and specifically Judaism at GCSE
  • An understanding of identifying and combatting discrimination through the study of Old Testament revelation in Key Stage 3, the Judaism content at GCSE and the themes within Core RE
  • An understanding of individual liberty throughout the two year Core RE course, with specific reference to NRMs and cults and extremism

Science

British Values in Science

Democracy

Pupils and students are made aware of the role of the democratic process in developing and upholding laws regarding scientific developments and processes.  This links with the role of regulatory authorities in monitoring and regulating scientific research and development.

The Rule of Law

Pupils and students look at different aspects of Science that are affected by laws and consider why laws are required to regulate scientific research. Pupils are encouraged to think about the reasoning behind these laws and how they affect scientists and the wider population.  Pupils and students are also encouraged to consider the roles of the Police, National Health Service and the Justice system in developing and upholding the laws which relate to Science and scientific research.

Pupils and students study the impact that scientific research has on everyday life.  They study the scientific processes that lead to ground breaking discoveries and look at how these develop into inventions that become part of society.  They are also encouraged to look at how the scientific process has developed over time and the importance of regulation and testing to ensure the safety of new technology.

Pupils take part in the ‘I’m a scientist- get me out of here’ programme which allows them to communicate with scientists and to talk about their work.  Year 12 students take part in the Engineering Education Scheme in conjunction with Airbus. 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9 Genetic engineering, cloning, recreational drugs.

Year 10 Drug development, IVF treatment, embryo screening

Year 11 DNA fingerprinting.

Year 12

Year 13 Uses of animals in research

Individual Liberty

The rights of the individual are important and pupils and students are made aware of this with regards to Science and scientific developments.  Many recent developments challenge the idea of what belongs to the individual and this needs to be discussed for pupils and students to be aware of how these ideas can be challenged.

Mutual Respect

Science lessons foster a culture of mutual respect where pupils and students are encouraged to give their own opinions in a safe and supportive environment.  Pupils and students take account of each others viewpoints whilst forming their own opinions.

Tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

Pupils and students are encouraged to consider the many different viewpoints that may be held with regard to ethical issues.  They are required to give considered arguments for both sides and then draw their own conclusions using evidence.  This can be done in many different ways including written work, debates and structured group work using varied sources. 

Year 7 Organ transplants

Year 8

Year 9 Genetic engineering, cloning, recreational drugs.

Year 10 Drug development, IVF treatment, embryo screening

Year 11 DNA fingerprinting.

Year 12

Year 13 Uses of animals in research

Social Sciences

British Values in Economics, Law, Psychology and Sociology

Through the study of A Levels in Economics, Law, Psychology and Sociology students develop:

An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process

  • how law is made
  • how Parliament works
  • the nature of Parliamentary Sovereignty
  • Judicial law making and democracy
  • the nature of and justification for judicial creativity in the making of law
  • understanding the importance of key economic decisions
  • understanding the role of government in economic policy
  • discussions of political policies and the issues of government failure

An appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their wellbeing and safety;

  • The nature of law and the rule of law:
  • individual obligations and rights
  • basic ideas about law and justice
  • individual responsibilities under criminal law and the law of tort
  • detailed analysis of an individual’s rights and responsibilities in criminal law
  • sociological understanding of the nature of law
  • the role of the education system and national and local responsibilities regarding the education and well- being of young people. An understanding of legislation which aims to protect young people in the family and the education system.
  • the role of the education system and national and local responsibilities regarding the education and well- being of young people. An understanding of legislation which aims to protect young people in the family and the education system.
  • the role of the police and the criminal justice system.

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary, and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence:

  • nature of the Parliamentary Law Making process
  • independence of the judiciary
  • relationship between Parliament Government and Judiciary in the making and administration of law

An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law:

  • freedom of expression and other fundamental man rights as protected by the Human Rights Act
  • the relationship between law and morality
  • the rights of a society as opposed to individual right
  • issues that arise due to religious beliefs within the family as well as within the education system.
  • legislation which surrounds faith schools
  • issues that arise as a consequence of holding particular religious beliefs and the possibility of conflicts which arise as a result

An acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour:

  • basic ideas about anti-discrimination and equality law
  • the issues that arise when law and individual morality are in conflict.
  • analysis of the philosophical and legal issues
  • different views on a range of issues including divorce and homosexuality
  • issues arising within the criminal justice system regarding gender and crime and ethnicity and crime. A review of the Stephen Lawrence case and the subsequent Macpherson report

An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination:

  • ideas of equality under the law and the protection of fundamental human rights
  • the nature of law and justice and the role of law in protecting individual rights and enforcing responsibilities
  • issues such as wage differentials and poverty
  • impact of globalisation on the developed and developing world
  • equality under the law and of the protection of human rights. Issues arising within the Family and Households Unit include the notion of ‘honour’ killings and within the Education unit differences in achievement between ethnic groups
  • equality under the law and of the protection of human rights